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Philadelphia Phillies 2013 Season in Review, Part Two of Three

October 4th, 2013 at 8:42 PM
By Ryan Beagle

This is the second of three parts of the Phillies 2013 season in review. This installment will cover the months of June and July.

At the beginning of June, the Phillies held a 26-30 record, and were in the midst of enjoying Domonic Brown’s coming-of-age hot streak that catapulted him to the top of the National League in a number of offensive categories. By June 6th, they had gone on a hot streak and broke the .500 mark for the first time all season, owning a 31-30 record after a 5-game win streak. The Phillies’ streaky play continued immediately after, as they went on to drop the next five games to soft opponents in the Milwaukee Brewers and Minnesota Twins, to end up right back where they started June – four games below .500.

By the end of June, the Phillies were five games under .500, at 39-44. They had lost games that, on paper, they should have won against weaker teams. At this point, it appeared as if they would not be able to sustain enough consistency as a team to be a threat in the second half of the season. However, they would finish strong leading up to the All-Star Break, winning 9 of 13 games, and breaking even at 48-48 at the unofficial end of the first half of the season.

Things looked much better for the Phillies post-All Star Break than they did two or three weeks earlier. A dominating 13-8 win in the first game of the unofficial second half of the season seemed to state that they were for real, and pushed them up over the .500 mark. Unfortunately, this was the last time they would be above .500 for the rest of the season, as the team absolutely fell apart offensively beginning in the second game after the All-Star Break. The Phillies went on to lose their next eight games, and would eventually drop 18 of 22 games on a streak that lasted into the middle August, effectively putting them out of contention, and ending Charlie Manuel’s tenure as manager.

The Phillies were just 50-57 by the end of July, after sitting at 49-48 on the 19th. The team made no moves at the trade deadline, baffling many people in the baseball world, as it appeared they had been taken out of legitimate contention a week or so before the deadline.

Ryan Howard was shut down in early July with his knee injury, and would not return to the team for the rest of the season. And in the middle of the Phillies’ pre-All Star Break hot streak, Ben Revere fouled a pitch off of his foot, breaking it and thereby ending his season. This happened on July 13th in the first of two games against the Chicago White Sox. Revere, who was hitting .305 at the time after a slow start, was an integral part of the Phillies offense by mid-July, and one has to wonder how he much he could have helped the team had he stayed healthy.

Jonathan Papelbon, who was incredibly solid through the first two months of the season, began to blow saves by the middle of the season. He blew 4 saves in the second half of June, while blowing just one in July. The bullpen as a whole lost 8 games in June and July. Mike Adams was lost for the season in mid-June, going down with three separate tears in his shoulder. Adams originally elected to seek rehabilitation for his shoulder as the solution, but decided in July that he would opt for surgery.

There was quite a predictable trend as far as the individual players – the more each individual was hitting, the better the team was doing. During some of the losing streaks, including the abysmal period where the Phillies lost 18 of 22 games, the offense was at times non-existent. Other than the aforementioned Ben Revere and Domonic Brown, no player’s individual performance stood out between the months of June and July. Chase Utley was relatively consistent, as was Michael Young – but none of their stats were anything to write home about.

And much like what is reflected in the team’s inconsistent play through the middle months of the season, the pitching was also rather inconsistent. Cliff Lee continued to put up good numbers on his part, but Kyle Kendrick began a slide into mediocrity which would continue into the end of the season. After Kendrick’s great start, his numbers began to tail off considerably by the middle of the season. Cole Hamels showed slight improvement by July, but did not really begin to even his numbers out to career levels until the end of the season.

Part three of this 2013 Phillies season in review will be coming in the next couple days. Stay tuned to Phillies 101. This is the second of three parts of the Phillies 2013 season in review. This installment will cover the months of June and July.

At the beginning of June, the Phillies held a 26-30 record, and were in the midst of enjoying Domonic Brown’s coming-of-age hot streak that catapulted him to the top of the National League in a number of offensive categories. By June 6th, they had gone on a hot streak and broke the .500 mark for the first time all season, owning a 31-30 record after a 5-game win streak. The Phillies’ streaky play continued immediately after, as they went on to drop the next five games to soft opponents in the Milwaukee Brewers and Minnesota Twins, to end up right back where they started June – four games below .500.

By the end of June, the Phillies were five games under .500, at 39-44. They had lost games that, on paper, they should have won against weaker teams. At this point, it appeared as if they would not be able to sustain enough consistency as a team to be a threat in the second half of the season. However, they would finish strong leading up to the All-Star Break, winning 9 of 13 games, and breaking even at 48-48 at the unofficial end of the first half of the season.

Things looked much better for the Phillies post-All Star Break than they did two or three weeks earlier. A dominating 13-8 win in the first game of the unofficial second half of the season seemed to state that they were for real, and pushed them up over the .500 mark. Unfortunately, this was the last time they would be above .500 for the rest of the season, as the team absolutely fell apart offensively beginning in the second game after the All-Star Break. The Phillies went on to lose their next eight games, and would eventually drop 18 of 22 games on a streak that lasted into the middle August, effectively putting them out of contention, and ending Charlie Manuel’s tenure as manager.

The Phillies were just 50-57 by the end of July, after sitting at 49-48 on the 19th. The team made no moves at the trade deadline, baffling many people in the baseball world, as it appeared they had been taken out of legitimate contention a week or so before the deadline.

Ryan Howard was shut down in early July with his knee injury, and would not return to the team for the rest of the season. And in the middle of the Phillies’ pre-All Star Break hot streak, Ben Revere fouled a pitch off of his foot, breaking it and thereby ending his season. This happened on July 13th in the first of two games against the Chicago White Sox. Revere, who was hitting .305 at the time after a slow start, was an integral part of the Phillies offense by mid-July, and one has to wonder how he much he could have helped the team had he stayed healthy.

Jonathan Papelbon, who was incredibly solid through the first two months of the season, began to blow saves by the middle of the season. He blew 4 saves in the second half of June, while blowing just one in July. The bullpen as a whole lost 8 games in June and July. Mike Adams was lost for the season in mid-June, going down with three separate tears in his shoulder. Adams originally elected to seek rehabilitation for his shoulder as the solution, but decided in July that he would opt for surgery.

There was quite a predictable trend as far as the individual players – the more each individual was hitting, the better the team was doing. During some of the losing streaks, including the abysmal period where the Phillies lost 18 of 22 games, the offense was at times non-existent. Other than the aforementioned Ben Revere and Domonic Brown, no player’s individual performance stood out between the months of June and July. Chase Utley was relatively consistent, as was Michael Young – but none of their stats were anything to write home about.

And much like what is reflected in the team’s inconsistent play through the middle months of the season, the pitching was also rather inconsistent. Cliff Lee continued to put up good numbers on his part, but Kyle Kendrick began a slide into mediocrity which would continue into the end of the season. After Kendrick’s great start, his numbers began to tail off considerably by the middle of the season. Cole Hamels showed slight improvement by July, but did not really begin to even his numbers out to career levels until the end of the season.

Part three of this 2013 Phillies season in review will be coming in the next couple days. Stay tuned to Phillies 101. 

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Tags: Baseball, MLB, Philadelphia, Philadelphia Phillies

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