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New York Giants Sign Tight End Daniel Fells, Linebacker Spencer Adkins & Two Others

January 7th, 2014 at 2:15 PM
By Dan Benton

Following private workouts held for nine players, including offensive lineman Ryan Lee and defensive end Alex Hall, the New York Giants have announced the signings of tight end Daniel Fells, linebacker Spencer Adkins, wide receiver Preston Parker and offensive lineman Troy Kropog.

Fells, who went undrafted in the 2006 NFL Draft, originally signed with the Atlanta Falcons. Since then, the journeyman tight end has made stops with six other teams including the Oakland Raiders (2007), Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2008), St. Louis Rams (2008-2010), Denver Broncos (2011), New England Patriots (2012) and Arizona Cardinals (2013).

In 71 career games, Fells has hauled in 92 passes for 1,086 yards and eight touchdowns. However, he did not play during the 2013 regular season, last seeing action in 2012 postseason against the eventual Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens.

Adkins, meanwhile, is a former sixth-round pick of the Atlanta Falcons in the 2009 NFL Draft. He played in 24 games with the team over a three year span, collecting only 15 tackles.

After being released by the Falcons in August of 2012, Adkins was signed by the Baltimore Ravens. However, he was later released with an injury settlement (hamstring) to make room for fullback Vonta Leach.

In addition to Fells, Parker, Kropok and Adkins, the Giants also worked out the aforementioned Ryan Lee and Alex Hall, as well as punters Dylan Breeding and Jordan Gay, safety Dwight Lowery, defensive end Cameron Sheffield and offensive lineman Edwin Williams.

The team had also previously signed kicker Brandon McManus to a Reserve/Futures contract.

Due to these signing, we have updated our 2014 Free Agency Scorecard.

(H/T to Ed Valentine for a keen eye)

Photo credit: rburtzel / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

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Tags: Daniel Fells, Football, New York, New York Giants, NFL, Preston Parker, Spencer Adkins, Troy Kropog

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52 Responses to “New York Giants Sign Tight End Daniel Fells, Linebacker Spencer Adkins & Two Others”

  1.  BadBadLeroyBrown says:

    I cant help but think “CANNON FODDER”

    • Dan BentonDan Benton says:

      Fells may not be. He probably stands an actual chance at sticking because the Giants’ tight ends are just so, so, so bad.

      •  BadBadLeroyBrown says:

        You are correct in saying our TE’s suck but if the 2014 season starts and Fells is our starting TE.

        LORD HELP US!

        Im holding out hope we target Brandon Pettigrew since he fits the Giant mold of TE. And reminds me of the Martellus Bennet situation after he left the Cowgirls.

        • Dan BentonDan Benton says:

          Not starting, but fodder doesn’t mean second or third string. This guy has a chance to be one of the three tight ends due to losing players in free agency, voidable contracts and lack of talent alone.

          •  Krow says:

            The Bear has had quite a good career despite a very limited skill level. No reason others can’t too.

          •  BadBadLeroyBrown says:

            Dan Id much rather go with some young guys w/potential than Fells couldnt make anyones roster last year and he was healthy.

            •  kujo says:

              Who exactly do you see as a “young guy” with “potential” at this point? I mean really. Like, who? Who on this roster is objectively worthy of a TE roster spot on this or ANY NFL team? And why is that person more deserving than this nobody Fells?

              If we draft a TE higher than the 5th or 6th round, they’ll get their shot, just like Fells will get his. And if Fells turns out to be the shiniest turd in the bunch, good on him.

              •  Krow says:

                Are you casting doubt upon the JPP of TEs !!!

              •  BadBadLeroyBrown says:

                kujo,

                Please o’ mighty one show me where exactly did I specifically state, said young player is on this team at the moment???

                With that said Id rather have Pascoe/ Adrien Robinson on the team than washed up never has been “Daniel Fells” o_O

                Fells couldnt sniff a spot in NewEngland and they go into the season with about 20 TE’s on the 53man…nor could he sneak on someone like the Jaguars roster.

                Like I said Fells is CANNON FODDER have him in camp as an extra body to push the other TE’s thats fine but thinking you’d get morte out of him good luck w/that wishful thinking.

                •  kujo says:

                  Canon fodder typically caries a certain negative connotation, particularly since it is LITERALLY a derogatory term for combatants who are regarded or treated as expendable in the face of enemy fire.

                  So, I ask you again–why do you think this guy is destined to fail? Do you think Reese is just filling the roster, or will this guy have the same shot to make the team that low-round picks and UDFAs like Kevin Boss, Jake Ballard, Bear Pascoe, Larry Donnell and Darcy Johnson have all had in the past?

                  Don’t bother answering–we all know the answer.

  2.  kujo says:

    Jen and I have been talking about the language surrounding players in the NFL.

    So much of the language of being a fan is unspecific, to the point of meaninglessness. I mean, think about it–whether it’s a player in the NFL, or a potential draft pick, the following phrases are thrown out as concrete, verifiable entities without ever really being explained, quantified or evaluated:

    “Elite QB”
    “Game manager”
    “Shutdown corner”
    “#1 WR”
    “Matchup nightmare TE”
    “Every down running back”
    “Game changing pass rusher”
    “Pocket collapsing DT”
    “Bookend”

    I hate to say it, but all this stuff–it’s all ****, because it’s all subjective. Ditto for the whole “rebuild” thing we were debating the other day–we aren’t rebuilding this whole team, but we are absolutely at the point of rebuilding several *units* on this team. But just like my “how many trees make a forest” hypothetical, I have to ask–what makes an “elite QB” different than a “game manager” on a specific, SUBSTANTIAL level? How many passes must a wide receiver catch, and from what area on the field, in order to reach “#1″ status? How many sacks and QB pressures and run-stuffs come from the left side of the offensive lines with “bookends?”

    The truth is that all this stuff–it’s all just hype and hooplah. Nothing really real…certainly not predictive or based upon reliable statistical measures that could be replicated in a real experiment.

    So let’s be cognizant of this when we talk about any player this offseason. Before typing out some lazy, trite, cliche-ridden “evaluation” on this player or that, ask yourself–is what I’m saying really REAL, or is it just regurgitated “commentary” from fat guys on coaches, or hair-pieces in swivel chairs? It’s fine to editorialize, but let’s not perpetuate this recycled rhetoric, spinning what doesn’t exist into faux-existence.

  3.  kujo says:

    Jen and I have been talking about the language surrounding players in the NFL.

    So much of the language of being a fan is unspecific, to the point of meaninglessness. I mean, think about it–whether it’s a player in the NFL, or a potential draft pick, the following phrases are thrown out as concrete, verifiable entities without ever really being explained, quantified or evaluated:

    “Elite QB”
    “Game manager”
    “Shutdown corner”
    “#1 WR”
    “Matchup nightmare TE”
    “Every down running back”
    “Game changing pass rusher”
    “Pocket collapsing DT”
    “Bookend”

    I hate to say it, but all this stuff–it’s all bullsh*t, because it’s all subjective. Ditto for the whole “rebuild” thing we were debating the other day–we aren’t rebuilding this whole team, but we are absolutely at the point of rebuilding several *units* on this team. But just like my “how many trees make a forest” hypothetical, I have to ask–what makes an “elite QB” different than a “game manager” on a specific, SUBSTANTIAL level? How many passes must a wide receiver catch, and from what area on the field, in order to reach “#1? status? How many sacks and QB pressures and run-stuffs come from the left side of the offensive lines with “bookends?”

    The truth is that all this stuff–it’s all just hype and hooplah. Nothing really real…certainly not predictive or based upon reliable statistical measures that could be replicated in a real experiment.

    So let’s be cognizant of this when we talk about any player this offseason. Before typing out some lazy, trite, cliche-ridden “evaluation” on this player or that, ask yourself–is what I’m saying really REAL, or is it just regurgitated “commentary” from fat guys on coaches, or hair-pieces in swivel chairs? It’s fine to editorialize, but let’s not perpetuate this recycled rhetoric, spinning what doesn’t exist into faux-existence.

    •  Krow says:

      Justin Tuck has a room for rent in his childhood home in Bunghole, Alabama. You two can debate the existence of dog while puffing a ganja blunt the size of rolled up newspaper.

      •  Jen Polashock says:

        Exactly how I spend my off-seasons, Krow. I just change up the locale. Kujo, I shall text you the rendezvous after that first Sunday in February.

      •  kujo says:

        Never touched the stuff, much to the chagrin of SimonGC that time we met up when my wife and I visited NYC a few years back. As you well know, I’m more of a scotch man.

    •  TroyThorne says:

      Almost all of these have specific attributes associated with them and make complete sense to me. Some of them are overused for sure but others evoke a pretty clear image.

      •  Krow says:

        Buzz Kill Troy.

      •  kujo says:

        Are these attributes concrete? Are they requirements? Or are they normative conclusions based upon qualitative observations made by fans, such as yourself and me, who, while knowledgeable, aren’t professional?

        I think it’s noteworthy that you rarely hear top-notch coaches and general managers use these terms when describing a player–other than Reese, whose rhetorical flourish and analogies always give hope to those who still labor under the impression that any of his 3rd and 4th round picks will every be anything but busts. Typically, you hear these phrases uttered by fans and professional talkers. So yes, I, too, know EXACTLY what they’re talking about when they say a cornerback is a “shutdown corner.” What I’m asking is does this trait really exist, and can it be something you just go out and find? Or is it just a lazy callback or a heuristic that we use when all we really want is the best player at every position ever?

  4.  Nosh.0 says:

    Revis, Petterson, Haden. and Sherman are shutdown corners.

    •  kujo says:

      Uh huh.

      It’s interesting that those corners are all different sizes. So what makes one a “shutdown corner?”

      •  Nosh.0 says:

        Athleticism.

        •  kujo says:

          Seems like every corner–and player–in the NFL possess a large amount of what would be evolutionarily referred to as “athleticism.”

          So, again, what sort of “athleticism” makes those guys “shutdown?”

          •  Nosh.0 says:

            The kind of athleticism that allows them to shut down WR’s.

            •  kujo says:

              You see where I’m at though, right? It’s all very nebulous.

              •  kujo says:

                Like, how many catches, or yards, does a corner have to prevent in order for a WR to have been “shutdown?” Is there data out there to support the existence of this class of players?

                •  kujo says:

                  And how many WR’s need a to have been “shutdown” in order for a corner to reach “shutdown” status?

              •  Nosh.0 says:

                Sehorn was a shutdown corner for a year before he blew out his knee.

                It all comes down to production. Can you leave a guy on an island and have him take a WR out of a game.

                I’d say that everyone of those guys possesses elite athletism, size, or football IQ. Nnamdi was shutdown for a time in Oak and was never considered the same athletic specimen as guys like C-Wood or Champ in their primes.

                •  Dirt says:

                  Nnamdi was never shutdown. He just played in th AFC West before it was cool to send 3 teams to the playoffs.

                  I’ll never forget how excited I was to see Philly signed him. Because it was the offseason following the last time Eli Manning left the game before the 4th quarter (until he was unnecessarily subjected to the worst offensive line in team history 3 weeks ago and got hurt), which was Coughlin’s highest scoring game in New York – an absolute assblazting of Nnamdi and the Raiders.

  5.  Dirt says:

    Man, I fvkin hate that guy Daniel Fells. What a fvkin bum! I’m glad I’m not the only one.

    •  kujo says:

      The moment we cut Brandon Myers, I guarantee he goes on Twitter and RT’s all the “hate-tweets” he’ll get. Because he hits the keys on his Blackberry harder than he hits defenders.

  6.  Nosh.0 says:

    #1 WR’s include Calvin (who is probably even better than a #1) AJ Green, Julio Jones, Demarius Thomas, Josh Gordon, Fitz, Andre, Dez.

    Just shy of #1 status are guys like Cruz, Desean, Marshall, Jeffery (although I’d like to see him do it again), Jordy, Torry Smith, and TY.

    I have made the case that Cruz in the past has been deserving of true #1 status, the way Steve Smith of Carolina was in his prime. But after this year I’ll give that argument a rest for the time being.

    And for scale purposes Louis Murphy is a true #6 WR.

  7.  jfunk says:

    While I agree on some of your choices, I think some of them are pretty self explanatory and none of them are about measurables like height.

    “Pocket Collapsing DT”? Really, you’re not sure what that one means?

    “Every down running back”…a guy that can do well in all situations, meaning he can run both between the tackles and outside, can run routes and catch passes, and can pass block. You don’t need to take him off the field for a “3rd down back” because he can’t do some of those things well.

    #1 WR – I’ve stated what my personal opinion of this is in the past and it’s pretty simple. A guy that can line up at X, dictate the defensive alignment when he does so, and still remain productive despite that special attention from the defense.

    Your desire to attach some kind of height/weight/speed ratio to the designations is unnecessary. Those descriptions are about what a guy does, not what he looks like.

  8.  Dirt says:

    About 8 years ago (granted, before the Goddell regime and all the rules that came with it), I had a great debate with a bunch of coworkers about the ideal cornerback.

    Long story short, we determined he needs to be on either end of the physical spectrum. He needs to either be like 5’9″, 170 with crazy quick or 6’2″+, 210+ with the ability to fight for position and balls. Anywhere in between, you’re too big to be quick and react, and you’re too small to fight.

    Case in point, you get a guy like Aaron Ross. Decent player, but simply not genetically able to be standout at 6’0″, 190. Victor Cruz and Anquan Boldan would both eat him up.

    Pick guys at either end of the spectrum. The quick guys can be in the pocket of anyone, forcing perfect throws. The big guys can move you off your spot. Tweeners get burned.

    •  Dirt says:

      Yes I understand that Revis and Bailey are in the 5’11″-6’0″, 195 range. I also think they’re simply great players, with high football IQ as well.

      However, there’s a proliferation of this size corner throughout the league as receivers get bigger and point totals get bigger.

      Meanwhile, look at Seatte for evidence of a secondary that shuts teams down in 2013-2014.

    •  Dirt says:

      The only guy a tweener can cover is Daniel Fells, cause that guy fvkin sucks.

  9.  Nosh.0 says:

    I don’t think there’s data or stats to figure it out. It’s an eye test. Like my checklist for a #1 WR is this:
    - Does he command double teams
    - Is he a top priority when game planning against
    - Can he change the game in a single play i.e. score from anywhere on the field i.e. deep threat
    - Can he take over a game i.e. Plax vs. Al Harris, Fitz in the 2008 playoffs, Steve Smith 2005 playoffs.

  10.  Nosh.0 says:

    When you earn shutdown corner status is basically when your D-coordinator has absolute confidence in singling you up with the other teams best WR, and leaving you like that for 60 minutes.

    QB’s even with single coverage, stop looking that way as the game goes on, and the man you’re matched up against becomes basically a non factor.

    •  jfunk says:

      Agreed.

      Shutdown Corner = guy that can lineup against a “True #1 WR” and prevent him from taking over the game. Doesn’t have to shut him out or anything, but if the guy can hold Calvin Johnson to a 4 for 40 type day with no help then he’s a shutdown corner in my book.

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