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NASCAR Has Some Explaining to Do After Dover

June 2nd, 2014 at 7:32 PM
By Clayton Caldwell

Believe it or not, NASCAR is at it again.

It was an interesting race at Dover for several reasons this past Sunday but one of the most interesting things that happened occurred on lap 159 when the concrete came up from the track surface causing damage to Jamie McMurray’s car causing McMurray to fall a lap down.

It was one of those incidents where bad luck truly occurred. McMurray did nothing wrong to cause the incident. The race would go under the red flag to fix the racetrack.

Fox Sports broadcaster Larry McReynolds then brought up a good point about Jamie McMurray’s car. McMurray, who had front valence damage on his racecar due to the concrete coming up from the track was told by NASCAR that his team could not work on his car during the red flag period. McReynolds said he felt NASCAR should let McMurray’s team work on their racecar because the incident was a problem with the racetrack and not self inflicted by McMurray.

'NASCAR 2008 - Infineon Raceway' photo (c) 2008, Brian Shamblen - license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Later during the red flag Fox Sports then explained that it is NASCAR’s responsibility to have the track in “raceable” conditions for the entire race. If that’s the case, which I have no reason to believe it’s not, than NASCAR would be at fault for McMurray’s incident. No? NASCAR has a responsibility to make sure the track was in a raceable condition which it wasn’t. Kevin Harvick even commented on his radio that that particular piece of asphalt had been an issue the entire weekend.

Yet NASCAR denied access to allow McMurray’s car to be worked on under the red flag, which is malarkey. I read several tweets during the red flag that “if it’s a rule NASCAR should stick by the rule.” I totally disagree with that. In the NASCAR rule book there is are four special letters at the end of each rule- “EIRI”, which stands for Except In Rare Instances. If what happened to McMurray isn’t a rare instance than what is and why are those letters even in the rule book?

To no surprise, we’ve seen NASCAR all over the map with instances like the one we saw with Jamie McMurray on Sunday. In 2012 at Charlotte a cable fell in the middle of the race track at Charlotte Motor Speedway, causing damage to several cars. In 2004, in a similar situation NASCAR didn’t let Jeff Gordon’s team work on his car after concrete came up at Martinsville Speedway.

In both McMurray’s case and Gordon’s case NASCAR’s did not follow through with their responsibility and there for both McMurray and Gordon paid the price.

If the McMurray incident wasn’t enough for you, don’t worry there is more.

On lap 362 NASCAR threw a caution flag for debris. At the time NASCAR was getting ready for a fuel mileage finish, something NASCAR fans have complained about in the past. However, the caution just happened at the right time causing Fox broadcaster Mike Joy to say “This changes everything.”

Just a coincidence? I don’t think so.

It leaves NASCAR in a tough spot for credibility is concerned and makes you scratch your head as to what is next.

 

Believe it or not, NASCAR is at it again.

It was an interesting race at Dover for several reasons this past Sunday but one of the most interesting things that happened occurred on lap 159 when the concrete came up from the track surface causing damage to Jamie McMurray’s car causing McMurray to fall a lap down.

It was one of those incidents where bad luck truly occurred. McMurray did nothing wrong to cause the incident. The race would go under the red flag to fix the racetrack.

Fox Sports broadcaster Larry McReynolds then brought up a good point about Jamie McMurray’s car. McMurray, who had front valence damage on his racecar due to the concrete coming up from the track was told by NASCAR that his team could not work on his car during the red flag period. McReynolds said he felt NASCAR should let McMurray’s team work on their racecar because the incident was a problem with the racetrack and not self inflicted by McMurray.

Later during the red flag Fox Sports then explained that it is NASCAR’s responsibility to have the track in “raceable” conditions for the entire race. If that’s the case, which I have no reason to believe it’s not, then NASCAR would be at fault for McMurray’s incident. No? NASCAR has a responsibility to make sure the track was in a raceable condition which it wasn’t. Kevin Harvick even commented on his radio that that particular piece of asphalt had been an issue the entire weekend.

Yet NASCAR denied access to allow McMurray’s car to be worked on under the red flag. I read several tweets during the red flag that “if it’s a rule NASCAR should stick by the rule.” I totally disagree with that. In the NASCAR rule book there are four special letters at the end of each rule- “EIRI”, which stands for Except In Rare Instances. If what happened to McMurray isn’t a rare instance then what is and why are those letters even in the rule book?

To no surprise, we’ve seen NASCAR all over the map with instances like the one we saw with Jamie McMurray on Sunday. In 2012 a cable fell in the middle of the race track at Charlotte Motor Speedway, causing damage to several cars. In that case NASCAR allowed the cars to be fixed.  In 2004, in a similar situation where a piece of track came up NASCAR didn’t let Jeff Gordon’s team work on his car after concrete came up at Martinsville Speedway.

In both McMurray’s case and Gordon’s case NASCAR did not follow through with their responsibility and therefore both McMurray and Gordon paid the price.

If the McMurray incident wasn’t enough for you, don’t worry there is more.

On lap 362 NASCAR threw a caution flag for debris. At the time NASCAR was getting ready for a fuel mileage finish, something NASCAR fans have complained about in the past. However, the caution just happened at the right time to end any chance at a fuel mileage race causing Fox broadcaster Mike Joy to say “This changes everything.”

Just a coincidence? I don’t think so.

It leaves NASCAR in a tough spot as far as credibility is concerned and makes you scratch your head as to what is next.

 

Tags: Fox Sports, Jamie McMurray, Motorsports, NASCAR, NASCAR Sprint Cup Series

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